The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha - Selections

V. Muṇḍa the King

41 (1) Utilization
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side. The Blessed One then said to him:
    “Householder, there are these five utilizations of wealth. What five?
    (1) “Here, householder, with wealth acquired by energetic striving, amassed by the strength of his arms, earned by the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained, the noble disciple makes himself happy and pleased and properly maintains himself in happiness; he makes his parents happy and pleased and properly maintains them in happiness; he makes his wife and children, his slaves, workers, and servants happy and pleased and properly maintains them in happiness. This is the first utilization of wealth.
    (2) “Again, with wealth acquired by energetic striving … righteously gained, the noble disciple makes his friends and companions happy and pleased and properly maintains them in happiness. This is the second utilization of wealth.
    (3) “Again, with wealth acquired by energetic striving … righteously gained, the noble disciple makes provisions with his wealth against the losses that might arise because of fire or floods, kings or bandits or unloved heirs; he makes himself secure against them. This is the third utilization of wealth.
    (4) “Again, with wealth acquired by energetic striving … righteously gained, the noble disciple makes the five oblations: to relatives, guests, ancestors, the king, and the deities. This is the fourth utilization of wealth.
    (5) “Again, with wealth acquired by energetic striving … [46] ... righteously gained, the noble disciple establishes an uplifting offering of alms—an offering that is heavenly, resulting in happiness, conducive to heaven—to those ascetics and brahmins who refrain from intoxication and heedlessness, who are settled in patience and mildness, who tame themselves, calm themselves, and train themselves for nibbāna. This is the fifth utilization of wealth.
    “These, householder, are the five utilizations of wealth. Householder, if a noble disciple’s wealth is exhausted when he has utilized it in these five ways, he thinks: ‘I have utilized wealth in these five ways and my wealth is exhausted.’ Thus he has no regret. But if a noble disciple’s wealth increases when he has utilized it in these five ways, he thinks: ‘I have utilized wealth in these five ways and my wealth has increased.’ Thus, either way, he has no regret.”

“I’ve enjoyed wealth,
supported my dependents,
and overcome adversities.
I have given an uplifting offering,
and performed the five oblations.
I have served the virtuous monks,
the self-controlled celibate ones.

“I have achieved whatever purpose
a wise person, dwelling at home,
might have in desiring wealth;
what I have done brings me no regret.”

Recollecting this, a mortal
remains firm in the noble Dhamma.
They praise him here in this life,
and after death he rejoices in heaven.

42 (2) The Good Person
“Bhikkhus, when a good person is born in a family, it is for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people. It is for the good, welfare, and happiness of (1) his mother and father, (2) his wife and children, (3) his slaves, workers, and servants, (4) his friends and companions, and (5) ascetics and brahmins. Just as a great rain cloud, nurturing all the crops, appears for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people, so too, [47] when a good person is born in a family, it is for the good, welfare, and happiness of many people. It is for the good, welfare, and happiness of his mother and father … ascetics and brahmins.”

The deities protect him
who is guarded by the Dhamma,
who has managed his wealth
for the welfare of many.

Since he is learned,
virtuous in behavior and observances,
steadfast in Dhamma,
fame does not abandon him.

Who is fit to blame him,
standing in Dhamma,
accomplished in virtuous behavior,
a speaker of truth,
possessing a sense of shame,
[pure] like a coin of refined gold?
Even the devas praise him;
by Brahmā, too, he is praised.

43 (3) Wished For 
Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side. The Blessed One then said to him:
    “Householder, there are these five things that are wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world. What five? Long life, householder, is wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world. Beauty … Happiness … Fame … The heavens are wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world. These are the five things that are wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world.
    “These five things, householder, that are wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world, I say, are not obtained by means of prayers or aspirations. If these five things that are wished for, desired, agreeable, and rarely gained in the world could be obtained by means of prayers [48] or aspirations, who here would be lacking in anything?
    (1) “Householder, the noble disciple who desires long life ought not to pray for long life or delight in it or [passively] yearn for it. A noble disciple who desires long life should practice the way conducive to long life. For when he practices the way conducive to long life, it leads to obtaining long life, and he gains long life either celestial or human.
    (2) “Householder, the noble disciple who desires beauty … (3) … who desires happiness … (4) … who desires fame ought not to pray for fame or delight in it or [passively] yearn for it. A noble disciple who desires fame should practice the way conducive to fame. For when he practices the way conducive to fame, it leads to obtaining fame, and he gains fame either celestial or human.
    (5) “Householder, the noble disciple who desires the heavens ought not to pray for the heavens or delight in them or [passively] yearn for them. A noble disciple who desires the heavens should practice the way conducive to heaven. For when he practices the way conducive to heaven, it leads to obtaining the heavens, and he gains the heavens.”

For one desiring long life, beauty, fame,
acclaim, heaven, high families,
and lofty delights
following in succession,
the wise praise heedfulness
in doing deeds of merit. [49]

Being heedful, the wise person
secures both kinds of good:
the good in this life,
and the good of the future life.
By attaining the good, the steadfast one
is called one of wisdom.

44 (4) The Giver of the Agreeable 
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Vesālī in the hall with the peaked roof in the Great Wood. Then, in the morning, the Blessed One dressed, took his bowl and robe, and went to the residence of the householder Ugga of Vesālī, where he sat down in the appointed seat. Then the householder Ugga of Vesālī approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to the Blessed One:
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my sal flower porridge is agreeable. Let the Blessed One accept it from me, out of compassion.’ The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion.
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my pork embellished with jujubes is agreeable. Let the Blessed One accept it from me, out of compassion.’ The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion.
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my fried vegetable stalks are agreeable. Let the Blessed One accept them from me, out of compassion.’ The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion.
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my boiled hill rice cleared of dark grains, accompanied by various sauces and condiments, is agreeable. Let the Blessed One accept it from me, out of compassion.’ The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion. [50]
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my Kāsi cloths are agreeable. Let the Blessed One accept them from me, out of compassion.’ The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion.
    “Bhante, in the presence of the Blessed One I heard and learned this: ‘The giver of what is agreeable gains what is agreeable.’ Bhante, my couch spread with rugs, blankets, and covers, with an excellent covering of antelope hide, with a canopy above and red bolsters at both ends, is agreeable. Although I know this is not allowable for the Blessed One, this sandalwood plank of mine is worth over a thousand. Let the Blessed One accept it from me, out of compassion.” The Blessed One accepted, out of compassion.
    Then the Blessed One expressed his appreciation to the householder Ugga of Vesālī thus:

“The giver of the agreeable gains the agreeable,
when he gives willingly to the upright ones
clothing, bedding, food, and drink,
and various kinds of requisites.

“Having known the arahants to be like a field
for what is relinquished and offered, not held back,
the good person gives what is hard to give:
the giver of agreeable things gains what is agreeable.”

Then, after expressing his appreciation to the householder Ugga of Vesālī, the Blessed One rose from his seat and left. Then, some time later, the householder Ugga of Vesālī passed away. After his death, the householder Ugga of Vesālī was reborn among a certain group of mind-made [deities]. On that occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. Then, when the night had advanced, the young deva Ugga, of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire [51] Jeta’s Grove, approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and stood to one side. The Blessed One then said to him: “I hope, Ugga, that it is as you would have wished.”
    “Surely, bhante, it is as I had wished.”
    Then the Blessed One addressed the young deva Ugga with verses:

“The giver of the agreeable gains the agreeable;
the giver of the foremost again gains the foremost;
the giver of the excellent gains the excellent;
the giver of the best reaches the best state.

“The person who gives the best,
the giver of the foremost,
the giver of the excellent,
is long-lived and famous
wherever he is reborn.”

45 (5) Streams
“Bhikkhus, there are these five streams of merit, streams of the wholesome, nutriments of happiness—heavenly, ripening in happiness, conducive to heaven—that lead to what is wished for, desired, and agreeable, to one’s welfare and happiness. What five?
    “(1) When a bhikkhu enters and dwells in a measureless concentration of mind while using a robe [that one has given him], one acquires a measureless stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, a nutriment of happiness … that leads … to one’s welfare and happiness. (2) When a bhikkhu enters and dwells in a measureless concentration of mind while using almsfood [that one has given him], one acquires a measureless stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, a nutriment of happiness … that leads … to one’s welfare and happiness. (3) When a bhikkhu enters and dwells in a measureless concentration of mind while using a dwelling [that one has given him], one acquires a measureless stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, a nutriment of happiness … that leads … to one’s welfare and happiness. (4) When a bhikkhu enters and dwells in a measureless concentration of mind while using a bed and chair [that one has given him], one acquires a measureless stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, a nutriment of happiness … that leads … to one’s welfare and happiness. (5) When a bhikkhu enters and dwells in a measureless concentration of mind while using medicinal requisites and [other] supports for the sick [that one has given him], [52] one acquires a measureless stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, a nutriment of happiness … that leads to one’s welfare and happiness.
    “These are the five streams of merit, streams of the wholesome, nutriments of happiness—heavenly, ripening in happiness, conducive to heaven—that lead to what is wished for, desired, and agreeable, to one’s welfare and happiness.
    “When, bhikkhus, a noble disciple possesses these five streams of merit, streams of the wholesome, it is not easy to measure his merit thus: ‘Just so much is his stream of merit, stream of the wholesome, nutriment of happiness—heavenly … that leads to … one’s welfare and happiness’; rather, it is reckoned simply as an incalculable, immeasurable, great mass of merit.
    “Bhikkhus, just as it is not easy to measure the water in the great ocean thus: ‘There are so many gallons of water,’ or ‘There are so many hundreds of gallons of water,’ or ‘There are so many thousands of gallons of water,’ or ‘There are so many hundreds of thousands of gallons of water,’ but rather it is reckoned simply as an incalculable, immeasurable, great mass of water; so too, when a noble disciple possesses these five streams of merit … it is reckoned simply as an incalculable, immeasurable, great mass of merit.”

Just as the many rivers used by the hosts of people,
flowing downstream, reach the ocean,
the great mass of water, the boundless sea,
the fearsome receptacle of heaps of gems; [53]
so the streams of merit reach the wise man
who is a giver of food, drink, and cloth;
[they reach] the donor of beds, seats, and covers
like rivers carrying their waters to the sea.”

46 (6) Accomplishments
“Bhikkhus, there are these five accomplishments. What five? Accomplishment in faith, accomplishment in virtuous behavior, accomplishment in learning, accomplishment in generosity, and accomplishment in wisdom. These are the five accomplishments.”

47 (7) Wealth 
“Bhikkhus, there are these five kinds of wealth. What five? The wealth of faith, the wealth of virtuous behavior, the wealth of learning, the wealth of generosity, and the wealth of wisdom.
    (1) “And what, bhikkhus, is the wealth of faith? Here, a noble disciple is endowed with faith. He places faith in the enlightenment of the Tathāgata thus: ‘The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, fortunate, knower of the world, unsurpassed trainer of persons to be tamed, teacher of devas and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.’ This is called the wealth of faith.
    (2) “And what is the wealth of virtuous behavior? Here, a noble disciple abstains from the destruction of life, abstains from taking what is not given, abstains from sexual misconduct, abstains from false speech, abstains from liquor, wine, and intoxicants, the basis for heedlessness. This is called the wealth of virtuous behavior.
    (3) “And what is the wealth of learning? Here, a noble disciple has learned much, remembers what he has learned, and accumulates what he has learned. Those teachings that are good in the beginning, good in the middle, and good in the end, with the right meaning and phrasing, which proclaim the perfectly complete and pure spiritual life—such teachings as these he has learned much of, retained in mind, recited verbally, mentally investigated, and penetrated well by view.
    (4) “And what is the wealth of generosity? Here, a noble disciple dwells at home with a heart devoid of the stain of miserliness, freely generous, open-handed, delighting in relinquishment, devoted to charity, delighting in giving and sharing. This is called the wealth of generosity.
    (5) “And what is the wealth of wisdom? Here, a noble disciple is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering. This is called the wealth of wisdom.
    “These, bhikkhus, are the five kinds of wealth.” [54]

When one has faith in the Tathāgata,
unshakable and well established,
and virtuous behavior that is good,
loved and praised by the noble ones;
when one has confidence in the Saṅgha
and one’s view has been straightened out,
they say that one is not poor,
that one’s life is not lived in vain.

Therefore an intelligent person,
remembering the Buddhas’ teaching,
should be intent on faith and virtuous behavior,
confidence and vision of the Dhamma.

48 (8) Situations
“Bhikkhus, there are these five situations that are unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world. What five? (1) ‘May what is subject to old age not grow old!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world. (2) ‘May what is subject to illness not fall ill!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (3) ‘May what is subject to death not die!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (4) ‘May what is subject to destruction not be destroyed!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (5) ‘May what is subject to loss not be lost!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world.
    (1) “Bhikkhus, for the uninstructed worldling, what is subject to old age grows old. When this happens, he does not reflect thus: ‘I am not the only one for whom what is subject to old age grows old. For all beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, what is subject to old age grows old. If I were to sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating my breast, and become confused when what is subject to old age grows old, I would lose my appetite and my features would become ugly. I would not be able to do my work, my enemies would be elated, and my friends would become saddened.’ Thus, when what is subject to old age grows old, he sorrows, languishes, laments, weeps beating his breast, and becomes confused. This is called an uninstructed worldling pierced by the poisonous dart of sorrow who only torments himself.
    (2) “Again, for the uninstructed worldling, [55] what is subject to illness falls ill … (3) … what is subject to death dies … (4) … what is subject to destruction is destroyed … (5) … what is subject to loss is lost. When this happens, he does not reflect thus: ‘I am not the only one for whom what is subject to loss is lost. For all beings who come and go, who pass away and undergo rebirth, what is subject to loss is lost. If I were to sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating my breast, and become confused when what is subject to loss is lost, I would lose my appetite and my features would become ugly. I would not be able to do my work, my enemies would be elated, and my friends would become saddened.’ Thus, when what is subject to loss is lost, he sorrows, languishes, laments, weeps beating his breast, and becomes confused. This is called an uninstructed worldling pierced by the poisonous dart of sorrow who only torments himself.
    (1) “Bhikkhus, for the instructed noble disciple, what is subject to old age grows old. When this happens, he reflects thus: ‘I am not the only one for whom what is subject to old age grows old. For all beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, what is subject to old age grows old. If I were to sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating my breast, and become confused when what is subject to old age grows old, I would lose my appetite and my features would become ugly. I would not be able to do my work, my enemies would be elated, and my friends would become saddened.’ Thus, when what is subject to old age grows old, he does not sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating his breast, and become confused. This is called an instructed noble disciple who has drawn out the poisonous dart of sorrow pierced by which the uninstructed worldling only torments himself. Sorrowless, without darts, the noble disciple realizes nibbāna.
    (2) “Again, for the instructed noble disciple, what is subject to illness falls ill … (3) … what is subject to death dies … (4) … what is subject to destruction is destroyed … (5) … what is subject to loss is lost. When this happens, he reflects thus: ‘I am not the only one for whom what is subject to loss is lost. For all beings that come and go, that pass away and undergo rebirth, what is subject to loss [56] is lost. If I were to sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating my breast, and become confused when what is subject to loss is lost, I would lose my appetite and my features would become ugly. I would not be able to do my work, my enemies would be elated, and my friends would become saddened.’ Thus, when what is subject to loss is lost, he does not sorrow, languish, lament, weep beating his breast, and become confused. This is called an instructed noble disciple who has drawn out the poisonous dart of sorrow pierced by which the uninstructed worldling only torments himself. Sorrowless, without darts, the noble disciple realizes nibbāna.
    “These, bhikkhus, are the five situations that are unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world.

“It is not by sorrowing and lamenting
that even the least good here can be gained.
Knowing that one is sorrowful and sad,
one’s enemies are elated.

“When the wise person does not shake in adversities,
knowing how to determine what is good,
his enemies are saddened, having seen
that his former facial expression does not change.

“Wherever one might gain one’s good,
in whatever way—by chanting, mantras,|
maxims, gifts, or tradition—there
one should exert oneself in just that way.

“But if one should understand: ‘This good
cannot be obtained by me or anyone else,’
one should accept the situation without sorrowing,
thinking: ‘The kamma is strong; what can I do now?’” [57]

49 (9) Kosala
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. Then King Pasenadi of Kosala approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side. [Now on that occasion Queen Mallikā had just died.] Then a man approached King Pasendi and whispered in his ear: “Sire, Queen Mallikā has just died.” When this was said, King Pasenadi was pained and saddened, and he sat there with slumping shoulders, facing downwards, glum, and speechless.
    Then the Blessed One, having known the king’s condition, said to him:
    “Great king, there are these five situations that are unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world.”
    [The rest of this sutta is identical with 5:48, including the verses.]

50 (10) Nārada
On one occasion the Venerable Nārada was dwelling at Pāṭaliputta at the Cock’s Park. Now on that occasion King Muṇḍa’s [wife] Queen Bhaddā, who had been dear and beloved to him, had died. Since her death, he did not bathe, anoint himself, eat his meals, or undertake his work. Day and night, he remained brooding over Queen Bhaddā’s body. Then King Muṇḍa addressed his treasurer, Piyaka: “Well then, friend Piyaka, [58] immerse Queen Bhaddā’s body in an iron vat filled with oil and enclose it in another iron vat so that we can see Queen Bhaddā’s body still longer.”
    “Yes, sire,” the treasurer Piyaka replied. Then he immersed Queen Bhaddā’s body in an iron vat filled with oil and enclosed it in another iron vat.
    Then it occurred to the treasurer Piyaka: “King Muṇḍa’s [wife] Queen Bhaddā has died, and she was dear and beloved to him. Since her death, he does not bathe, anoint himself, eat his meals, or undertake his work. Day and night, he remains brooding over the queen’s body. What ascetic or brahmin can King Muṇḍa visit, so that, having heard his Dhamma, he might abandon the dart of sorrow?”
    Then it occurred to Piyaka: “The Venerable Nārada is dwelling at Pāṭaliputta, in the Cock’s Park. Now a good report about this Venerable Nārada has circulated thus: ‘He is wise, competent, intelligent, learned, an artful speaker, eloquent, mature, and an arahant.’ Suppose King Muṇḍa would visit the Venerable Nārada: perhaps if he hears the Venerable Nārada’s Dhamma, he would abandon the dart of sorrow.”
    Then the treasurer Piyaka approached King Muṇḍa and said to him: “Sire, the Venerable Nārada is dwelling at Pāṭaliputta, in the Cock’s Park. Now a good report about this Venerable Nārada has circulated thus: ‘He is wise … and an arahant.’ Your majesty should visit the Venerable Nārada. Perhaps, when you hear the Venerable Nārada’s Dhamma, you would abandon the dart of sorrow.’ [The king said:] “Well then, friend Piyaka, [59] inform the Venerable Nārada. For how can one like me think of approaching an ascetic or brahmin living in his realm without first informing him?”
    “Yes, sire,” Piyaka replied. Then he went to the Venerable Nārada, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said: “Bhante, King Muṇḍa’s [wife] Queen Bhaddā, who was dear and beloved to him has died. Since the queen’s death, he does not bathe, anoint himself, eat his meals, or undertake his work. Day and night, he remains brooding over the queen’s body. It would be good, bhante, if the Venerable Nārada would teach the Dhamma to King Muṇḍa in such a way that he can abandon the dart of sorrow.”
    “Then let King Muṇḍa come at his own convenience.”
    Then the treasurer Piyaka rose from his seat, paid homage to the Venerable Nārada, circumambulated him keeping the right side toward him, and went to King Muṇḍa. He told the king: “Sire, the Venerable Nārada has given his consent. You may go at your own convenience.”
    “Well then, friend Piyaka, get the finest carriages harnessed!”
    “Yes, sire,” Piyaka replied, and after he had gotten the finest carriages harnessed he told King Muṇḍa: “Sire, the finest carriages have been harnessed. You may go at your own convenience.”
    Then King Muṇḍa mounted a fine carriage, and along with the other carriages he set out in full royal splendor for the Cock’s Park to see the Venerable Nārada. He went by carriage as far as the ground was suitable for a carriage, and then he dismounted from his carriage and entered the park on foot. He approached the Venerable Nārada, paid homage to him, and sat down to one side. [60] The Venerable Nārada then said to him:
    “Great king, there are these five situations that are unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world. What five? (1) ‘May what is subject to old age not grow old!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world. (2) ‘May what is subject to illness not fall ill!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (3) ‘May what is subject to death not die!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (4) ‘May what is subject to destruction not be destroyed!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic … or by anyone in the world. (5) ‘May what is subject to loss not be lost!’: this is a situation that is unobtainable by an ascetic or a brahmin, by a deva, Māra, or Brahmā, or by anyone in the world….
    [The sequel is identical to 5:48, including the verses.] …
    When this was said, King Muṇḍa asked the Venerable Nārada: “Bhante, what is the name of this exposition of the Dhamma?”
    “Great king, this exposition of the Dhamma is named the extraction of the dart of sorrow.”
    “Surely, bhante, it is the extraction of the dart of sorrow! Surely, it is the extraction of the dart of sorrow, for having heard this exposition of the Dhamma, I have abandoned the dart of sorrow.”
    Then King Muṇḍa said to the treasurer Piyaka: “Well then, friend Piyaka, have Queen Bhaddā’s body cremated and build a memorial mound for her. From today on, I will bathe and anoint myself and eat my meals and undertake my work.” [63]

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