Classic and Contemporary Buddhist Works

The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha - Selections

II. Protector

11 (1) Lodging
“Bhikkhus, when a bhikkhu who possesses five factors resorts to and uses a lodging that possesses five factors, in no long time, with the destruction of the taints, he might realize for himself with direct knowledge, in this very life, the taintless liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, and having entered upon it, dwell in it.
    “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu possess five factors?
   (1) “Here, a bhikkhu is endowed with faith. He has faith in the enlightenment of the Tathāgata thus: ‘The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, fortunate, knower of the world, unsurpassed trainer of persons to be tamed, teacher of devas and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.’
   (2) “He is seldom ill or afflicted, possessing an even digestion that is neither too cool nor too hot but moderate and suitable for striving.
   (3) “He is honest and open, one who reveals himself as he really is to the Teacher and his wise fellow monks.
   (4) “He has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities.
   (5) “He is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering.
    “It is in this way that a bhikkhu possesses five factors.
    “And how does a lodging possess five factors?
   (6) “Here, the lodging is neither too far [from a place for alms] nor too close, and it possesses a means for going and returning.
   (7) “During the day it is not disturbed by people and at night it is quiet and still.
   (8) “There is little contact with flies, mosquitoes, wind, the burning sun, and serpents.
   (9) “One dwelling in that lodging can easily obtain robes, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and provisions for the sick.
   (10) “In that lodging elder bhikkhus are dwelling who are learned, heirs to the heritage, [16] experts on the Dhamma, experts on the discipline, experts on the outlines. He approaches them from time to time and inquires: ‘How is this, bhante? What is the meaning of this?’ Those venerable ones then disclose to him what has not been disclosed, clear up what is obscure, and dispel his perplexity about numerous perplexing points.
    “It is in this way that a lodging possesses five factors.
    “When a bhikkhu who possesses these five factors resorts to and uses a lodging that possesses these five factors, in no long time, with the destruction of the taints, he might realize for himself with direct knowledge, in this very life, the taintless liberation of mind, liberation by wisdom, and having entered upon it, dwell in it.&rdquo

12 (2) Five Factors
“Bhikkhus, a bhikkhu who has abandoned five factors and possesses five factors is called, in this Dhamma and discipline, a supreme person who is consummate and has completely lived the spiritual life.
    “And how has a bhikkhu abandoned five factors? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned sensual desire, ill will, dullness and drowsiness, restlessness and remorse, and doubt. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has abandoned five factors.
    “And how does a bhikkhu possess five factors? Here, a bhikkhu possesses the aggregate of virtuous behavior of one beyond training, the aggregate of concentration of one beyond training, the aggregate of wisdom of one beyond training, the aggregate of liberation of one beyond training, and the aggregate of the knowledge and vision of liberation of one beyond training. It is in this way that a bhikkhu possesses five factors.
    “When a bhikkhu has abandoned these five factors and possesses these five factors, he is called, in this Dhamma and discipline, a supreme person who is consummate and complete in living the spiritual life.”

When sensual desire and ill will,
dullness and drowsiness,
restlessness, and doubt are
totally absent in a bhikkhu; [17]
when one like this possesses
the virtue and concentration
of one beyond training,
and [similar] liberation and knowledge;
possessing five factors
and having removed five factors,
he is truly called a consummate one
in this Dhamma and discipline.

13 (3) Fetters
“Bhikkhus, there are these ten fetters. What ten? The five lower fetters and the five higher fetters. And what are the five lower fetters? Personal-existence view, doubt, wrong grasp of behavior and observances, sensual desire, and ill will. These are the five lower fetters. And what are the five higher fetters? Attachment to form, attachment to the formless, conceit, restlessness, and ignorance. These are the five higher fetters. These, bhikkhus, are the ten fetters.”

14 (4) Mental Barrenness
“Bhikkhus, if any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has not abandoned five kinds of mental barrenness and eradicated five bondages of the mind, then, whether night or day comes, only deterioration in wholesome qualities and not growth is to be expected for this person.
    “What are the five kinds of mental barrenness that he has not abandoned?
    (1) “Here, a bhikkhu is perplexed about the Teacher, doubts him, is not convinced about him and does not place confidence in him. When a bhikkhu is perplexed about the Teacher, doubts him, is not convinced about him and does not place confidence in him, his mind does not incline to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind does not incline to ardor … [18] … and striving, this is the first kind of mental barrenness that he has not abandoned.
    (2)–(5) “Again, a bhikkhu is perplexed about the Dhamma … perplexed about the Saṅgha … perplexed about the training … is irritated by his fellow monks, displeased with them, aggressive toward them, ill disposed toward them. When a bhikkhu is irritated by his fellow monks, displeased with them, aggressive toward them, ill disposed toward them, his mind does not incline to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind does not incline to ardor … and striving, this is the fifth kind of mental barrenness that he has not abandoned.
    “These are the five kinds of mental barrenness that he has not abandoned.
    “What are the five bondages of the mind that he has not eradicated?
    (6) “Here, a bhikkhu is not devoid of lust for sensual pleasures, not devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for them. When a bhikkhu is not devoid of lust for sensual pleasures, not devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for them, his mind does not incline to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind does not incline to ardor … and striving, this is the first bondage of the mind that he has not eradicated.
    (7)–(10) “Again, a bhikkhu is not devoid of lust for the body, not devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for it.… He is not devoid of lust for form, not devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for it.… Having eaten as much as he wants until his belly is full, he is intent upon the pleasure of rest, the pleasure of sloth, the pleasure of sleep … he lives the spiritual life aspiring for [rebirth in] a certain order of devas, [thinking]: ‘By this virtuous behavior, observance, austerity, or spiritual life I will be a deva or one [in the retinue] of the devas.’ When he lives the spiritual life aspiring for [rebirth in] a certain order of devas … his mind does not incline [19] to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind does not incline to ardor … and striving, this is the fifth bondage of the mind that he has not eradicated.
    “These are the five bondages of mind that he has not eradicated.
    “If any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has not abandoned these five kinds of mental barrenness and eradicated these five bondages of the mind, then, whether night or day comes, only deterioration and not growth in wholesome qualities is to be expected for them. Just as during the dark fortnight, whether night or day comes, the moon only deteriorates in beauty, roundness, and brightness, in diameter and circumference, so too, if any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has not abandoned these five kinds of mental barrenness … only deterioration … is to be expected for them.
    “Bhikkhus, if any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has abandoned five kinds of mental barrenness and eradicated five bondages of the mind, then, whether night or day comes, only growth in wholesome qualities and not deterioration is to be expected for this person.
    “And what are the five kinds of mental barrenness that he has abandoned?
    (1) “Here, a bhikkhu is not perplexed about the Teacher, does not doubt him, is convinced about him and places confidence in him. When a bhikkhu is not perplexed about the Teacher, does not doubt him, is convinced about him and places confidence in him, his mind inclines to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind inclines to ardor … and striving, this is the first kind of mental barrenness that he has abandoned.
    (2)–(5) “Again, a bhikkhu is not perplexed about the Dhamma … not perplexed about the Saṅgha … not perplexed about the training [20] … is not irritated by his fellow monks, is pleased with them, not aggressive toward them, well disposed toward them. When a bhikkhu is not irritated by his fellow monks … well disposed toward them, his mind inclines to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind inclines to ardor … and striving, this is the fifth kind of mental barrenness that he has abandoned.
    “These are the five kinds of mental barrenness that he has abandoned.
    “What are the five bondages of the mind that he has well eradicated?
    (6) “Here, a bhikkhu is devoid of lust for sensual pleasures, devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for them. When a bhikkhu is devoid of lust for sensual pleasures, devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for them, his mind inclines to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind inclines to ardor … and striving, this is the first bondage of the mind that he has well eradicated.
    (7)–(10) “Again, a bhikkhu is devoid of lust for the body, devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for it.… He is devoid of lust for form, devoid of desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving for it.… He does not eat as much as he wants until his belly is full nor is he intent upon the pleasure of rest, the pleasure of sloth, the pleasure of sleep.… He does not live the spiritual life aspiring for [rebirth in] a certain order of devas, [thinking]: ‘By this virtuous behavior, observance, austerity, or spiritual life I will be a deva or one [in the retinue] of the devas.’ Since he does not live the spiritual life aspiring for [rebirth in] a certain order of devas … his mind inclines to ardor, effort, perseverance, and striving. Since his mind inclines to ardor … and striving, this is the fifth bondage of the mind that he has well eradicated.
    “These are the five bondages of the mind that he has well eradicated.
    “If any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has abandoned these five kinds of mental barrenness and well eradicated these five bondages of the mind, [21] then, whether night or day comes, only growth in wholesome qualities and not deterioration is to be expected for them. Just as during the bright fortnight, whether night or day comes, the moon only increases in beauty, roundness, and brightness, in diameter and circumference, so too, if any bhikkhu or bhikkhunī has abandoned these five kinds of mental barrenness and well eradicated these five bondages of the mind, then, whether night or day comes, only growth in wholesome qualities and not deterioration is to be expected for them.”

15 (5) Heedfulness
(1) “Bhikkhus, to whatever extent there are beings, whether footless or with two feet, four feet, or many feet, whether having form or formless, whether percipient or non-percipient, or neither percipient nor non-percipient, the Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One is declared foremost among them. So too, all wholesome qualities are rooted in heedfulness and converge upon heedfulness and heedfulness is declared foremost among them.
   (2) “Just as the footprints of all animals that roam on land fit into the footprint of the elephant, and the elephant’s footprint is declared foremost among them, that is, with respect to size, so too, all wholesome qualities are rooted in heedfulness and converge upon heedfulness and heedfulness is declared foremost among them.
   (3) “Just as all the rafters of a peaked house lean toward the roof peak, slope toward the roof peak, converge upon the roof peak, and the roof peak is declared foremost among them, so too, all wholesome qualities are rooted in heedfulness and converge upon heedfulness and heedfulness is declared foremost among them. [22]
   (4) “Just as, of all fragrant roots, black orris is declared foremost among them, so too….
   (5) “Just as, of all fragrant heartwoods, red sandalwood is declared foremost among them, so too….
   (6) “Just as, of all fragrant flowers, jasmine is declared foremost among them, so too….
   (7) “Just as all petty princes are the vassals of a wheel-turning monarch, and the wheel-turning monarch is declared foremost among them, so too….
   (8) “Just as the radiance of all the stars does not amount to a sixteenth part of the radiance of the moon, and the radiance of the moon is declared foremost among them, so too….
   (9) “Just as, in the autumn, when the sky is clear and cloudless, the sun, ascending in the sky, dispels all darkness from space as it shines and beams and radiates, so too….
   (10) “Just as, whatever great rivers there are—that is, the Ganges, the Yamunā, the Aciravatī, the Sarabhū, and the Mahī—all head toward the ocean, slant, slope, and incline toward the ocean, and the ocean is declared foremost among them, so too, all wholesome qualities are rooted in heedfulness and converge upon heedfulness and heedfulness is declared foremost among them.” [23]

16 (6) Worthy of Gifts
“Bhikkhus, these ten persons are worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, an unsurpassed field of merit for the world. What ten? The Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One; a paccekabuddha, the one liberated in both respects, the one liberated by wisdom, the body-witness, the one attained to view, the one liberated by faith, the Dhamma-follower, the faith-follower, and the clan-joiner. These ten persons are worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, an unsurpassed field of merit for the world.”

17 (7) Protector (1)
“Bhikkhus, live under a protector, not without a protector. One without a protector lives in suffering. There are these ten qualities that serve as a protector. What ten?
   (1) “Here, a bhikkhu is virtuous; he dwells restrained by the Pātimokkha, possessed of good conduct and resort, seeing danger in minute faults. Having undertaken the training rules, he trains in them. Since a bhikkhu is virtuous … trains in them, this is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (2) “Again, a bhikkhu has learnt much, remembers what he has learnt, and accumulates what he has learnt. Those teachings that are good in the beginning, good in the middle, and good in the end, with the right meaning and phrasing, which proclaim the perfectly complete and pure spiritual life—such teachings as these he has learnt much of, retained in mind, recited verbally, investigated mentally, and penetrated well by view. Since a bhikkhu has learnt much … and penetrated well by view, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (3) “Again, a bhikkhu has good friends, [24] good companions, good comrades. Since a bhikkhu has good friends, good companions, good comrades, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (4) “Again, a bhikkhu is easy to correct and possesses qualities that make him easy to correct; he is patient and receives instruction respectfully. Since a bhikkhu is easy to correct … and receives instruction respectfully, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (5) “Again, a bhikkhu is skillful and diligent in attending to the diverse chores that are to be done for his fellow monks; he possesses sound judgment about them in order to carry out and arrange them properly. Since a bhikkhu is skillful and diligent … this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (6) “Again, a bhikkhu loves the Dhamma and is pleasing in his assertions, filled with a lofty joy pertaining to the Dhamma and discipline. Since a bhikkhu loves the Dhamma … this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (7) “Again, a bhikkhu has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities. Since a bhikkhu has aroused energy … not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector. [25]
   (8) “Again, a bhikkhu is content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and provisions for the sick. Since a bhikkhu is content with any kind of … supports for the sick, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (9) “Again, a bhikkhu is mindful, possessing supreme mindfulness and alertness, one who remembers and recollects what was done and said long ago. Since a bhikkhu is mindful … and recollects what was done and said long ago, this, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (10) “Again, a bhikkhu is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering. Since a bhikkhu is wise … too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
    “Bhikkhus, live under a protector, not without a protector. One without a protector lives in suffering. These are the ten qualities that serve as a protector.”

18 (8) Protector (2)
“Bhikkhus, live under a protector, not without a protector. One without a protector lives in suffering. There are these ten qualities that serve as a protector. What ten?
   (1) “Here, a bhikkhu is virtuous; he dwells restrained by the Pātimokkha, possessed of good conduct and resort, seeing danger in minute faults. Having undertaken the training rules, he trains in them. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu is truly virtuous.... Having undertaken the training rules, he trains in them,’ the elder bhikkhus, [26] those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (2) “Again, a bhikkhu has learnt much, remembers what he has learnt, and accumulates what he has learnt. Those teachings that are good in the beginning … with the right meaning and phrasing, which proclaim the perfectly complete and pure spiritual life—such teachings as these he has learnt much of, retained in mind, recited verbally, investigated mentally, and penetrated well by view. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu has truly learnt much ... and penetrated well by view,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (3) “Again, a bhikkhu has good friends, good companions, good comrades. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly has good friends, good companions, good comrades,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (4) “Again, a bhikkhu is easy to correct and possesses qualities that make him easy to correct; he is patient and receives instruction respectfully. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu is truly easy to correct and possesses qualities that make him easy to correct; he is patient and receives instruction respectfully,’ the elder bhikkhus, [27] those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (5) “Again, a bhikkhu is skillful and diligent in attending to the diverse chores that are to be done for his fellow monks; he possesses sound judgment about them in order to carry out and arrange them properly. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu is truly skillful and diligent ... in order to carry out and arrange them properly,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (6) “Again, a bhikkhu loves the Dhamma and is pleasing in his assertions, filled with a lofty joy pertaining to the Dhamma and discipline. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly loves the Dhamma and is pleasing in his assertions, filled with a lofty joy pertaining to the Dhamma and discipline,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (7) “Again, a bhikkhu has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly has aroused energy ... [28] ... not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (8) “Again, a bhikkhu is content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and provisions for the sick. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly is content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and provisions for the sick,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (9) “Again, a bhikkhu is mindful, possessing supreme mindfulness and alertness, one who remembers and recollects what was done and said long ago. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly is mindful, possessing supreme mindfulness and alertness, one who remembers and recollects what was done and said long ago,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
   (10) “Again, a bhikkhu is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering. [Having considered:] ‘This bhikkhu truly is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering,’ the elder bhikkhus, those of middle standing, and the junior bhikkhus think he should be corrected [29] and instructed. Since they all have compassion for him, only growth in wholesome qualities and not decline is to be expected for him. This, too, is a quality that serves as a protector.
    “Bhikkhus, live under a protector, not without a protector. One without a protector lives in suffering. These are the ten qualities that serve as a protector.”

19 (9) Abodes of the Noble Ones (1)
“Bhikkhus, there are these ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones of the past, present, or future abide. What ten?
    “Here, a bhikkhu (1) has abandoned five factors; (2) possesses six factors; (3) has a single guard (4) and four supports; (5) has dispelled personal truths, (6) totally renounced seeking, (7) purified his intentions, (8) tranquilized bodily activity, and become (9) well liberated in mind and (10) well liberated by wisdom. These are the ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones of the past, present, or future abide.&rdquo

20 (10) Abodes of the Noble Ones (2)
On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Kurus near the Kuru town named Kammāsadamma. [30] There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus … The Blessed One said this:
    “Bhikkhus, there are these ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones abide in the past, present, or future. What ten?
    “Here, a bhikkhu (1) has abandoned five factors; (2) possesses six factors; (3) has a single guard (4) and four supports; (5) has dispelled personal truths, (6) totally renounced seeking, (7) purified his intentions, (8) tranquilized bodily activity, and become (9) well liberated in mind and (10) well liberated by wisdom.
    (1) “And how has a bhikkhu abandoned five factors? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned sensual desire, ill will, dullness and drowsiness, restlessness and remorse, and doubt. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has abandoned five factors.
    (2) “And how does a bhikkhu possess six factors? Here, having seen a form with the eye, a bhikkhu is neither joyful nor saddened, but dwells equanimous, mindful and clearly comprehending. Having heard a sound with the ear … Having smelled an odor with the nose … Having experienced a taste with the tongue … Having felt a tactile object with the body … Having cognized a mental phenomenon with the mind, a bhikkhu is neither joyful nor saddened, but dwells equanimous, mindful and clearly comprehending. It is in this way that a bhikkhu possesses six factors.
    (3) “And how does a bhikkhu have a single guard? Here, a bhikkhu possesses a mind guarded by mindfulness. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has a single guard.
    (4) “And how does a bhikkhu have four supports? Here, having reflected, a bhikkhu uses some things, patiently endures other things, avoids still other things, and dispels still other things. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has four supports. [31]
    (5) “And how has a bhikkhu dispelled personal truths? Here, whatever ordinary personal truths may be held by ordinary ascetics and brahmins—that is, ‘The world is eternal’ or ‘The world is not eternal’; ‘The world is finite’ or ‘The world is infinite’; ‘The soul and the body are the same’ or ‘The soul is one thing and the body another’; ‘The Tathāgata exists after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata does not exist after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata both exists and does not exist after death’ or ‘The Tathāgata neither exists nor does not exist after death’—a bhikkhu has discarded and dispelled them all, given them up, rejected them, let go of them, abandoned and relinquished them. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has dispelled personal truths.
    (6) “And how has a bhikkhu totally renounced seeking? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned the search for sensual pleasures and the search for existence and has allayed the search for a spiritual life. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has totally renounced seeking.
    (7) “And how has a bhikkhu purified his intentions? Here, a bhikkhu has abandoned sensual intention, intention of ill will, and intention of harming. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has purified his intentions.
    (8) “And how has a bhikkhu tranquilized bodily activity? Here, with the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous passing away of joy and dejection, a bhikkhu enters and dwells in the fourth jhāna, neither painful nor pleasant, which has purification of mindfulness by equanimity. It is in this way that a bhikkhu has tranquilized bodily activity.
    (9) “And how is a bhikkhu well liberated in mind? Here, a bhikkhu’s mind is liberated from lust, hatred, and delusion. It is in this way that a bhikkhu is well liberated in mind.
    (10) “And how is a bhikkhu well liberated by wisdom? [32] Here, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I have abandoned lust, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising; I have abandoned hatred … abandoned delusion, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising.’ It is in this way that a bhikkhu is well liberated by wisdom.
    “Bhikkhus, whatever noble ones in the past abided in noble abodes, all abided in these same ten noble abodes. Whatever noble ones in the future will abide in noble abodes, all will abide in these same ten noble abodes. Whatever noble ones at present abide in noble abodes, all abide in these same ten noble abodes.
    “These are the ten abodes of the noble ones in which the noble ones abide in the past, present, or future.”

How to cite this document:

© Bhikkhu Bodhi, The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2012)

Creative Commons License
This selection from The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha by Bhikkhu Bodhi is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/numerical-discourses-buddha.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.wisdompubs.org/terms-use.